Aaaand We’re Back

Well, not really. That was just a ploy to make you read.

That guy looks like Spock.

That guy looks like Spock.

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One thing that happens, year after year, is December becomes my blog’s high point because of this. It’s also the time of year that makes me say “Yes, I will come back to this!” and then I kinda…don’t. That makes me sad.

sad pug
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So this time, I’m not going to say when I’ll be back or what I plan to do or any of that junk because it always backfires. But I will say: I’ll be back.

Back bacon. Bet you didn't expect that!

Back bacon. Bet you didn’t expect that!

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For now, enjoy what I’ve posted and know that I am learning SO MUCH about research, food, stories, writing…I’ve made it a point, however, not to learn how to Photoshop better because where’s the sense in that? I’m already a pro.

Proof.

Proof.

To everyone who has read, liked, commented in the last month – thank you. I’m always so honored when readers find my blog enjoyable. It’s inspiring knowing that what I feel passionate about is of interest to others. It’s good to know you care.

 

So for now, I’m going to keep trying to get OK grades in school. When I have a little downtime, I’ll come back and tell some food stories, aka “Foodlore,” a phrase my father coined in a fit on excitement about my future. In the meantime, feel free to read some of my old stuff. But not the really old stuff. It’s not very good.

 

This is The Foodlorist, signing out…for now.

 

Keep eating and asking, my friends.

Esther

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Watch the Pot, for It Shall Boil

Hello, readers!

They're so eeny weeny.

They’re so eeny weeny.

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I realize that I have sadly neglected my blog for a very long time and with Christmas coming around, I’m getting the customary increase in hits (PAGE VIEWS!!!!!).

SHE LOVES PAGE VIEWS.

SHE LOVES PAGE VIEWS.

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There are a multitude of reasons for my laxness (the most notable of which are getting married, relocating to Boston, and going to grad school while working a full time job) but the time has come to pony up and do what I came here to do:

Write a bunch of stuff about food that people will or will not read.

This is a fine and accurate example of food.

This is a fine and accurate example of food.

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I’m taking my winter break to reorganize, rethink, and refocus. My time at Boston University’s Gastronomy program has helped me narrow down my interests even further, making this here blog easier to handle. After all, writing is a journey (seriously, read my first post then read my most recent post – it’s embarrassing). First you find your voice, then you find your topic, then you find out how to make millions of dollars by writing silly blog posts on the internet.

What have we learned?

  1. Write
  2. Find voice
  3. ????
  4. PROFIT!

THE PROFIT IS REAL.

THE PROFIT IS REAL.

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So, to those that are new: Keep an eye on this space for it shall be glorious.

And to those that are old: Thanks for not giving up on me.

Keep eating and asking, my friends.

Esther

Tidbit Tuesday: Language of the Soda Fountain

Aw yis. You know what day it is.

tibit tuesday(source)

If you’re a normal human being, you love ice cream. If you’re not a normal human being, then you may be an alien. If you’re a nostalgic human being, you love the idea of the Soda Fountain.

soda fountain

It’s a soda jerk. Haven’t you always wondered why he’s called a jerk?

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The first Soda Fountain shows up in the 1820s, but didn’t gain popularity until one made a guest appearance at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. They didn’t reach full steam until 1919 when prohibition made life a whole lot more boring. With nothing to drink but milkshakes, the explosion of the soda fountain culture spawned a new food language.

1876 Philadelphia Centennial soda fountain

Mammoth Soda Fountain at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. There were a few other fountains there, including Tuft’s.

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Soda fountain lingo developed because orders were placed without the use of tickets or computers (unless there were androids which is entirely possible). It needed to be clear and concise because the intense and busy environment didn’t leave much time for deciphering orders. They also needed to be memorable so something like “dog and maggot” wasn’t uncommon.

Here’s some of my favorite soda fountain language.

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Introducing: The Hodgepodge

If you’re familiar with my Twitter account, you’re familiar with my habit of occasionally over-tweeting links. While I love sharing the work of my fellows, it’s not particularly sustainable. I’ve decided to cave to the latest trend and post a listacle every week with what I think are the best of the best, and since what I think is usually correct, you’ll know you truly are seeing the very best on teh interwebz.

It shall be called: The Hodgepodge.

hodgepodge

This is a hodgepodge.

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All links will relate to food history, anthropology, culture, and so on. I’ll try to keep it short, 5-7 links, but obviously no promises. I’ll try to keep it witty, but definitely no promises.

Today’s Hodgepodge only includes links from…well…yesterday and today, but starting next week you’ll get a real Hodgepodge. There’s also more links than normal, which might leave you wondering how I’m going to narrow down a full week to 7 links when I can’t even do it for 2 days.

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Long Time, No Blog

Hello, People of Dubious Origin! Long time no talk!

The definition of "dubious origin."

The definition of “dubious origin.”

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Things are going pretty good. Here’s a short update:

We’re 3 months from the wedding. School is…school. I am now a copywriter.

Done.

lol Frodo.

lol Frodo.

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Anyway, school is over in about 4 weeks and I’m taking the summer off, which means I’ll be back to blogging my butt off. I’m putting together some Tidbit Tuesdays to ease myself back into the blogging game. In the meantime, there are several places you can keep up with me.

Twitter – Obviously.

Facebook – I heard it’s the new MySpace.

Pinterest – Now with more food history and anthropology. And pugs.

Keep eating and asking, my friends.

Esther

Admission of Defeat

Oy. This did not go nearly as smoothly as I hoped.

Get it? Cause it's Rocky Road?

Get it? Cause it’s Rocky Road?

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Last year I was unemployed and living in a place I hated. My guess is 25 Days was a special way to escape that. It turned out to be so much fun that I was determined to do it again the following year, but plan ahead so there wasn’t the same scramble.

Obviously I didn’t end up planning.

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Day 3: Carp & Vánoční Rybí Polévka

Christmas in the Czech Republic is bathed in superstition and tradition. The list is long and, amazingly, many Czech families follow most, if not all, the rules. There are some good ones – like the table should be set for an even number of guests because an odd number brings bad luck or death. Or the first person to leave the table will die in the coming year so everyone has to get up at the same time. And my personal favorite, if you fast all day you will see zlaté prasátko, the golden piglet who brings good fortune, on the wall before dinner.

Omg shhhh he's sleeeepin.

Omg shhhh he’s sleeeepin.

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I want to see the golden piglet.

Even though the majority of Czech aren’t actually that religious, they place importance on those superstitions and traditions. Another tradition that seems to have stuck is carp. Traditionally, a Czech Christmas dinner consists of anywhere between 9 and 12 meatless (or supposed to be meatless) courses depending on the area of the country. Like other cultures that eat fish on Christmas, carp is symbolic of the Last Supper. Families that served 12 dishes were invoking Jesus’ 12 apostles.

Om...noms?

Om…noms?

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